What Kitty Did by Trisha Bora

A clever, witty and delightful take on what it’s like being an adult.

I started reading What Kitty Did after hearing only praises about the genius that Trisha Bora baked. Upon reading a few chapters, I knew why. The novel is cleverly written, it has an element of suspense and drama without being serious. It’s packed with wit and sarcasm and occasional puns that make it a delightful read. For a debut novel, Trisha Bora was successful at bringing a fresh take on the life of a 20-something year old..

Meet Kitty aka Ketaki Roy, a millennial, who is freshly out of college with an English Literature degree, trying to make a real cut in this fast-paced, utterly uncompromising world. Working in a fashion magazine named Poise, our protagonist struggles to live up to the demands of her work. Kitty comes off as irresponsible and rather below average at her job and making terrible situations when it comes to the matter of the heart. She struggles to manage a decent job, her relationships whilst drinking at the drop of a hat and partying. Despite her outrageous lifestyle, Kitty comes off as highly relatable. There’s something about her that attracts the readers’ attention.

No one tells you how things actually work out. No one writes a children’s book warning kids about how shit life can be.

Assigned to work on a piece about the late celebrity, Roxanne, Kitty unintentionally dives straight into what could be called a potential murder. Not realizing what she’s gotten herself into, Kitty decides to take up the challenge and find out who murdered the famous actress. Here starts the real fun. From trespassing to late auto-rides, to practically putting herself in the mouth of danger, Kitty battles it all. The novel becomes a page-turner when Kitty starts unfolding the mystery leading to the murder.

The references in the novel are any Literature student’s dream. If you’re someone who has a passion for the written word, you’d understand the analogies. There’s a lot of shade being thrown at Lit students and being one myself, I couldn’t stop laughing at the harsh reality. Take for instance,

Journalism has ensured I will never ever live in such places. If only I had Tiger Mother-ed my brain and done an MBA or some such….Not only does English Lit offer pathetic career choices, it also ensures total cock-blocking to wondrous real estate.

Kitty ‘s sense of humor is self-deprecating, she tries to hide behind a mask of sarcasm and wit and tries to escape situations much like the rest of us. Always relying on her best friends, the protagonist sees through life’s trials and tribulations, stumbling but eventually rising up again. What Kitty Did is refreshing as it takes on a whole new perspective about what it’s like stepping into “Adulthood”.

 


Author: Trisha Bora

Publisher: HarperCollins India

Rating: 3.9/5

Pages: 305

Format: Paperback

 

Blurb:

Kitty Roy has more troubles than she can count on her fingers. Her love life is wonky, her paycheck is shit. She has badly behaved hair and struggles with a sugar addiction. To top it off, her pushy mother has set her up with a gorgeous but stuck-up guy who is sending her mixed signals.

When a diplomat’s celebrity wife, Roxy Merchant, falls dead during dinner at their posh central Delhi bungalow, Kitty’s boss gives her a chance to write a profile piece and the hint of a promotion. As she works on her article, Kitty realizes there’s more to Roxy Merchant’s death. She’s on to something big, and it can, perhaps, change her current life forever. But Kitty also has a knack for bungling things up majorly.

Set in the winter of her discontent, What Kitty Did is an irresistible caper zipping through the streets of Delhi.

Author: Shumaila Taher

I am Shumaila Taher, editor and writer. I exist in between the pages of a book.

5 thoughts on “What Kitty Did by Trisha Bora”

  1. An interesting review and somewhat different from another review I read of the same book. The things you highlight as being noteworthy are what the other reviewer disliked 😀 Speaks volumes for our preferences, doesn’t it?

    Personally, I’d give this book a pass because the lives of 20-somethings don’t interest me unless the plot is really well written and free of plot holes. The language doesn’t seem the best, at least, based on the extract and the couple of quotes you’ve shared. Perhaps because it’s a debut book? I may be wrong, of course.

    The review itself is well written 🙂

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